Update READMEs etc. for the forthcoming ppp-2.4.5 release
authorPaul Mackerras <paulus@samba.org>
Sat, 6 Sep 2008 08:42:27 +0000 (18:42 +1000)
committerPaul Mackerras <paulus@samba.org>
Sat, 6 Sep 2008 12:21:22 +0000 (22:21 +1000)
Signed-off-by: Paul Mackerras <paulus@samba.org>
README
README.MPPE
README.MSCHAP80
README.linux
README.pppoe
README.pwfd
ppp.texi [deleted file]

diff --git a/README b/README
index 953fbe6b6b0c4073acd3511ac15f50846e3bfe31..f0125cdbb6cf52e66f3992f357b542a003534fe6 100644 (file)
--- a/README
+++ b/README
@@ -8,11 +8,10 @@ Introduction.
 
 The Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP) provides a standard way to establish
 a network connection over a serial link.  At present, this package
-supports IP and the protocols layered above IP, such as TCP and UDP.
-The Linux and Solaris ports of this package have optional support for
-IPV6; the Linux port of this package also has support for IPX.
+supports IP and IPV6 and the protocols layered above them, such as TCP
+and UDP.  The Linux port of this package also has support for IPX.
 
-This software consists of two parts:
+This PPP implementation consists of two parts:
 
 - Kernel code, which establishes a network interface and passes
 packets between the serial port, the kernel networking code and the
@@ -29,6 +28,13 @@ code for NeXTStep, FreeBSD, SunOS 4.x, SVR4, Tru64 (Digital Unix), AIX
 and Ultrix but no active maintainers for these platforms.  Code for
 all of these except AIX is included in the ppp-2.3.11 release.
 
+The kernel code for Linux is no longer distributed with this package,
+since the relevant kernel code is in the official Linux kernel source
+(and has been for many years) and is included in all reasonably modern
+Linux distributions.  The Linux kernel code supports using PPP over
+things other than serial ports, such as PPP over Ethernet and PPP over
+ATM.
+
 
 Installation.
 *************
@@ -55,9 +61,25 @@ use any IP address.  (This only applies where the peer is
 authenticating itself to you, of course.)
 
 
-What's new in ppp-2.4.4.
+What's new in ppp-2.4.5.
 ************************
 
+* Under Linux, pppd can now operate in a mode where it doesn't request
+  the peer's IP address, as some peers refuse to supply an IP address.
+  Since Linux supports device routes as well as gateway routes, it's
+  possible to have no remote IP address assigned to the ppp interface
+  and still route traffic over it.
+
+* The PPP over L2TP plugin is included, which works with the pppol2tp
+  PPP channel code in the Linux kernel.  This allows pppd to be used
+  to set up tunnels using the Layer 2 Tunneling Protocol.
+
+* Several bugs have been fixed.
+
+
+What was new in ppp-2.4.4.
+**************************
+
 * Pppd will now run /etc/ppp/ip-pre-up, if it exists, after creating
   the ppp interface and configuring its IP addresses but before
   bringing it up.  This can be used, for example, for adding firewall
@@ -226,23 +248,6 @@ BSD-Compress and Deflate (which uses the same algorithm as gzip) don't
 ever expand packets.
 
 
-Patents.
-********
-
-The BSD-Compress algorithm used for packet compression is the same as
-that used in the Unix "compress" command.  It was apparently covered
-by U.S. patents 4,814,746 (owned by IBM) and 4,558,302 (owned by
-Unisys), and corresponding patents in various other countries (but not
-Australia).  Apparently the Unisys patent expired in the US on 20 June
-2003, but the IBM patent is still pending.
-
-If these patents are of concern in your situation, you can build the
-package without including BSD-Compress.  To do this, edit
-net/ppp-comp.h to change the definition of DO_BSD_COMPRESS to 0.  The
-bsd-comp.c files are then no longer needed, so the references to
-bsd-comp.o may optionally be removed from the Makefiles.
-
-
 Contacts.
 *********
 
@@ -276,4 +281,3 @@ The primary site for releases of this software is:
        ftp://ftp.samba.org/pub/ppp/
 
 
-($Id: README,v 1.37 2006/05/29 23:51:29 paulus Exp $)
index 94b8456f8a4af3f343c5bdb8ee41357563a5ee72..1d62efd16cc13f6244a1b138f52ac8f06b3f5c8a 100644 (file)
@@ -4,6 +4,8 @@ PPP Support for MPPE (Microsoft Point to Point Encryption)
 Frank Cusack           frank@google.com
 Mar 19, 2002
 
+Updated by Paul Mackerras, Sep 2008
+
 
 DISCUSSION
 
@@ -59,17 +61,9 @@ RADIUS support for MPPE is from Ralf Hofmann, <ralf.hofmann@elvido.net>.
 BUILDING THE PPPD
 
 The userland component of PPPD has no additional requirements above
-those for MS-CHAP and MS-CHAPv2.  The kernel, however, requires SHA-1
-and ARCFOUR.  Public domain implementations of these are provided.
+those for MS-CHAP and MS-CHAPv2.
 
-Until such time as MPPE support ships with kernels, you can use
-the Linux 2.2 or 2.4 implementation that comes with PPPD.  Run the
-ppp/linux/mppe/mppeinstall.sh script, giving it the location to your
-kernel source.  Then add the CONFIG_PPP_MPPE option to your config and
-rebuild the kernel.  The ppp_mppe.o module is added, and the ppp.o module
-(2.2) or ppp_generic.o (2.4) is modified (unfortunately).  You'll need
-the new ppp.o/ppp_generic.o since it does the right thing for the 4
-extra bytes problem discussed above.
+MPPE support is now included in the mainline Linux kernel releases.
 
 
 CONFIGURATION
@@ -79,7 +73,6 @@ than 2.4.15, you will need to add
 
     alias ppp-compress-18 ppp_mppe
 
-to /etc/modules.conf.  (A patch for earlier versions of modutils is included
-with the kernel patches.)
+to /etc/modules.conf.
 
 
index 3fcd56684b76808e103523500322fdfa1efa784e..2c3172ab77f535c099892493f01d602de5c00a31 100644 (file)
@@ -25,65 +25,11 @@ a value of 5.  If you enable PPP debugging with the "debug" option and
 see something like the following in your logs, the remote server is
 requesting MS-CHAP:
 
-  rcvd [LCP ConfReq id=0x2 <asyncmap 0x0> <auth chap 80> <magic 0x46a3>]
-                                           ^^^^^^^^^^^^
+  rcvd [LCP ConfReq id=0x2 <asyncmap 0x0> <auth MS> <magic 0x46a3>]
+                                           ^^^^^^^
 
-The standard pppd implementation will indicate its lack of support for
-MS-CHAP by NAKing it:
-
-  sent [LCP ConfNak id=0x2 <auth chap 05>]
-
-Windows NT Server systems are often configured to "Accept only
-Microsoft Authentication" (this is intended to enhance security).  Up
-until now, that meant that you couldn't use this version of PPPD to
-connect to such a system.
-
-
-BUILDING THE PPPD
-
-MS-CHAP uses a combination of MD4 hashing and DES encryption for
-authentication.  You may need to get Eric Young's libdes library in
-order to use my MS-CHAP extensions.  A lot of UNIX systems already
-have DES encryption available via the crypt(3), encrypt(3) and
-setkey(3) interfaces.  Some may (such as that on Digital UNIX)
-provide only the encryption mechanism and will not perform
-decryption.  This is okay.  We only need to encrypt to perform
-MS-CHAP authentication.
-
-If you have encrypt/setkey available, then hopefully you need only
-define these two things in your Makefile: -DUSE_CRYPT and -DCHAPMS.
-Skip the paragraphs below about obtaining and building libdes.  Do
-the "make clean" and "make" as described below.  Linux users
-should not need to modify their Makefiles.  Instead,
-just do "make CHAPMS=1 USE_CRYPT=1".
-
-If you don't have encrypt and setkey, you will need Eric Young's
-libdes library.  You can find it in:
-
-ftp://ftp.funet.fi/pub/crypt/mirrors/ftp.psy.uq.oz.au/DES/libdes-3.06.tar.gz
-
-Australian residents can get libdes from Eric Young's site:
-
-ftp://ftp.psy.uq.oz.au/pub/Crypto/DES/libdes-3.06.tar.gz
-
-It is also available on many other sites (ask Archie).
-
-I used libdes-3.06, but hopefully anything newer than that will work
-also.  Get the library, build and test it on your system, and install
-it somewhere (typically /usr/local/lib and /usr/local/include).
-
-
-
-You should now be ready to (re)compile the PPPD.  Go to the pppd
-subdirectory and make sure the Makefile contains "-DCHAPMS" in the
-CFLAGS or COMPILE_FLAGS macro, and that the LIBS macro (or LDADD for
-BSD systems) contains "-ldes".  Depending on your system and where the
-DES library was installed, you may also need to alter the include and
-library paths used by your compiler.
-
-Do a "make clean" and then a "make" to rebuild pppd.  Assuming all
-goes well, install the new pppd and move on to the CONFIGURATION
-section.
+MS-CHAP is enabled by default under Linux in pppd/Makefile.linux by
+the line "CHAPMS=y".
 
 
 CONFIGURATION
index d454b45ad4c4c63a5082201d28357178911c64f5..d441427e4d2885c5c897b876354cd87daad097e5 100644 (file)
@@ -5,6 +5,7 @@
                8 March 2001
 
                for ppp-2.4.2
+               Updated for ppp-2.4.5, Sep 08
 
 1. Introduction
 ---------------
@@ -13,8 +14,8 @@ The Linux PPP implementation includes both kernel and user-level
 parts.  This package contains the user-level part, which consists of
 the PPP daemon (pppd) and associated utilities.  In the past this
 package has contained updated kernel drivers.  This is no longer
-necessary, as the current 2.2 and 2.4 kernel sources contain
-up-to-date drivers.
+necessary, as the current kernel sources contain up-to-date drivers
+(and have done since the 2.4.x kernel series).
 
 The Linux PPP implementation is capable of being used both for
 initiating PPP connections (as a `client') or for handling incoming
@@ -47,7 +48,7 @@ the link down, when it negotiates a graceful disconnect.
 
 2.1 Kernel driver
 
-Assuming you are running a recent 2.2 or 2.4 (or later) series kernel,
+Assuming you are running a recent 2.4 or 2.6 (or later) series kernel,
 the kernel source code will contain an up-to-date kernel PPP driver.
 If the PPP driver was included in your kernel configuration when your
 kernel was built, then you only need to install the user-level
@@ -64,7 +65,7 @@ under /lib/modules and is loaded into the kernel when needed.
 
 The 2.2 series kernels contain an older version of the kernel PPP
 driver, one which doesn't support multilink.  If you want multilink,
-you need to run the latest 2.4 series kernel.  The kernel PPP driver
+you need to run a 2.4 or 2.6 series kernel.  The kernel PPP driver
 was completely rewritten for the 2.4 series kernels to support
 multilink and to allow it to operate over diverse kinds of
 communication medium (the 2.2 driver only operates over serial ports
@@ -94,7 +95,7 @@ If you obtained this package in .rpm or .deb format, you simply follow
 the usual procedure for installing the package.
 
 If you are using the .tar.gz form of this package, then cd into the
-ppp-2.4.1b1 directory you obtained by unpacking the archive and issue
+ppp-2.4.5 directory you obtained by unpacking the archive and issue
 the following commands:
 
 $ ./configure
@@ -111,34 +112,15 @@ files.
 2.3 System setup for 2.4 kernels
 
 Under the 2.4 series kernels, pppd needs to be able to open /dev/ppp,
-character device (108,0).  If you are using devfs (the device
-filesystem), the /dev/ppp node will automagically appear when the
-ppp_generic module is loaded, or at startup if ppp_generic is compiled
-in.
+character device (108,0).  If you are using udev (as most distributions
+do), the /dev/ppp node should be created by udevd.
 
-If you have ppp_generic as a module, and you are using devfsd (the
-devfs daemon), you will need to add a line like this to your
-/etc/devfsd.conf:
-
-LOOKUP         ppp             MODLOAD
-
-Otherwise you will need to create a /dev/ppp device node with the
+Otherwise you may need to create a /dev/ppp device node with the
 commands:
 
 # mknod /dev/ppp c 108 0
 # chmod 600 /dev/ppp
 
-If you use module autoloading and have PPP as a module, you will need
-to add the following to your /etc/modules.conf or /etc/conf.modules:
-
-alias /dev/ppp         ppp_generic
-alias char-major-108   ppp_generic
-alias tty-ldisc-3      ppp_async
-alias tty-ldisc-14     ppp_synctty
-alias ppp-compress-21  bsd_comp
-alias ppp-compress-24  ppp_deflate
-alias ppp-compress-26  ppp_deflate
-
 
 2.4 System setup under 2.2 series kernels
 
index 51c99e0ac931c8ec8df2e0d9b922a0e539255ab6..5284e4da6863bc05adec59e504ed5a4bdde3823f 100644 (file)
@@ -5,12 +5,13 @@
                8 August 2001
 
                for ppp-2.4.2
+               Updated for ppp-2.4.5 by Paul Mackerras, Sep 08
 
 1. Introduction
 ---------------
 
 This document describes the support for PPP over Ethernet (PPPoE)
-included with this packages.  It is assumed that the reader is
+included with this package.  It is assumed that the reader is
 familiar with Linux PPP (as it pertains to tty/modem-based
 connections).  In particular, users of PPP in the Linux 2.2 series
 kernels should ensure they are familiar with the changes to the PPP
@@ -19,7 +20,7 @@ PPPoE features.
 
 If you are not familiar with PPP, I recommend looking at other
 packages which include end-user configuration tools, such as Roaring
-Penguin (http://www.roaringpenguin.com/pppoe)
+Penguin (http://www.roaringpenguin.com/pppoe).
 
 PPPoE is a protocol typically used by *DSL providers to manage IP
 addresses and authenticate users.  Essentially, PPPoE provides for a
@@ -42,10 +43,8 @@ This section is a quick guide for getting PPPoE working, to allow one
 to connect to their ISP who is providing PPPoE based services.
 
 1.  Enable "Prompt for development and/or incomplete code/drivers" and
-    "PPP over Ethernet" in your kernel configuration.  If you choose to
-    use the PPP over Ethernet driver as a module adding "alias
-    net-pf-24 pppoe" to /etc/modules.conf will enable auto-loading
-    of the modules.
+    "PPP over Ethernet" in your kernel configuration.  Most distributions
+    will include the kernel PPPoE module by default.
 
 2.  Compile and install your kernel.
 
index aff87df5f70099e3059b51c9f4920e7a8bc54473..f6c5d9b8dff84ccb7d2607de2a67add67475dcac 100644 (file)
@@ -17,7 +17,7 @@ The passwordfd feature offers a simpler and more secure solution. The program
 that starts the pppd opens a pipe and writes the password into it. The pppd
 simply reads the password from that pipe.
 
-This methods is used for quiet a while on SuSE Linux by the programs wvdial,
+This methods is used for quite a while on SuSE Linux by the programs wvdial,
 kppp and smpppd.
 
 
diff --git a/ppp.texi b/ppp.texi
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index d5678c5..0000000
--- a/ppp.texi
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,561 +0,0 @@
-\input texinfo @c -*-texinfo-*-
-@setfilename ppp.info
-@settitle PPP
-
-@iftex
-@finalout
-@end iftex
-
-@ifinfo
-@format
-START-INFO-DIR-ENTRY
-* PPP: (ppp).                   Point-to-Point Protocol.
-END-INFO-DIR-ENTRY
-@end format
-
-@titlepage
-@title PPP-2.x Users' Guide
-@author by Paul Mackerras
-@end titlepage
-
-@node Top, Introduction, (dir), (dir)
-
-@ifinfo
-This file documents how to use the ppp-2.x package to set up network
-links over serial lines with the Point-to-Point Protocol.
-
-@end ifinfo
-
-@menu
-* Introduction::                Basic concepts of the Point-to-Point
-                                Protocol and the ppp-2.x package.
-* Installation::                How to compile and install the software.
-* Configuration::               How to set up your system for
-                                establishing a link to another system.
-* Security::                    Avoid creating security holes.
-* Compression::                 Using compression of various kinds
-                                to improve throughput.
-@end menu
-
-@node Introduction, Installation, Top, Top
-@chapter Introduction
-
-The Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP) is the protocol of choice for
-establishing network links over serial lines.  This package (ppp-2.x)
-provides an implementation of PPP which supports the Internet Protocols
-(TCP/IP, UDP/IP, etc.) and which runs on a range of Unix workstations.
-
-A typical use of PPP is to provide a network connection, via a modem,
-between a workstation and an Internet Service Provider (ISP).  When this
-connection is established, the workstation is connected to the internet,
-and applications running on the workstation can then make connections to
-other hosts anywhere on the internet.  This package can be used at
-either or both ends of such a link.
-
-Features of PPP include:
-@itemize @bullet
-@item
-Multi-protocol support.  The PPP packet encapsulation includes a
-protocol field, allowing packets from many different protocols to be
-multiplexed across a single link.
-@item
-Negotiation of link characteristics.  During link establishment, the two
-systems negotiate about the link configuration parameters, such as the
-IP addresses of each end of the link.
-@item
-Authentication.  Optionally, each system can be configured to require the
-other system to authenticate itself.  In this way, access can be
-restricted to authorized systems.
-@item
-Transparency.  On asynchronous serial lines, PPP can be configured to
-transmit certain characters as a two-character escape sequence.
-@item
-Compression.  PPP includes support for various kinds of compression to
-be applied to the packets before they are transmitted.
-@end itemize
-
-The ppp-2.x software consists of two parts:
-
-@itemize @bullet
-
-@item
-Kernel code, which establishes a network interface and passes packets
-between the serial port, the kernel networking code and the PPP daemon
-(@file{pppd}).  This code is implemented using STREAMS modules on
-Solaris 2, SunOS 4.x, AIX 4.1 and OSF/1, and as a tty line discipline
-under Ultrix, NextStep, NetBSD, FreeBSD, and Linux.
-
-@item
-The PPP daemon (@file{pppd}), which negotiates with the peer to
-establish the link and sets up the ppp network interface.  Pppd includes
-support for authentication.  It can authenticate itself to the other
-system and/or require the other system to authenticate itself, so that
-you can control which other systems may make a PPP connection and what
-IP addresses they may use.
-@end itemize
-
-@menu
-* PPP Concepts::                Basic concepts and terms used with PPP.
-* PPP packet format::           How data is packaged up for transmission.
-* LCP negotiation::             The parameters which are negotiated
-                               using the Link Control Protocol.
-* IPCP negotiation::            The parameters which are negotiated
-                               using the IP Control Protocol.
-@end menu
-
-@node PPP Concepts, PPP packet format, Introduction, Introduction
-@section PPP Concepts
-
-To use PPP to provide a network connection between two machines, there
-must be some way that a stream of bytes, or characters, can be passed
-from one to the other, in both directions independently.  We refer to
-this as the ``serial link''.  Very often the serial link involves
-asynchronous communications ports and modems, but other kinds of serial
-link are possible.
-
-The serial link must transmit (at least) 8 bits per character; PPP
-cannot work over a serial link which transmits only 7 bits per
-character.  However, it need not transmit all byte values transparently. 
-PPP has a mechanism to avoid sending certain characters if it is known
-that the some element of the serial link interprets them specially.  For
-example, the DC1 and DC3 ASCII characters (control-Q and control-S) may
-be trapped by a modem if it is set for ``software'' flow control.  PPP
-can send these characters as a two-character ``escape'' sequence.  The
-set of characters which are to be transmitted as an escape sequence is
-represented in an ``async control character map'' (ACCM).  The ``async''
-part refers to the fact that this facility is used for asynchronous
-serial links.  For synchronous serial connections, the HDLC bit-stuffing
-procedure is used instead.
-
-The two systems connected by the serial link are called ``peers''.  When
-we are talking from the point of view of one of the systems, the other
-is often referred to as ``the peer''.  Sometimes we may refer to one
-system as a ``client'' and the other as a ``server''.  This distinction
-refers mainly to the way the serial link is set up; usually the client
-is the peer that initiates the connection, for example by dialling the
-server with its modem.
-
-During the lifetime of a PPP connection, it proceeds through several
-phases:
-
-@enumerate
-@item
-Serial link establishment.  In this phase, the serial link is set up and
-PPP protocol software is attached to each end of the serial link.  The
-precise steps involved in doing this vary greatly, depending on the
-nature of the serial link.  For the common case of modems connected
-through the telephone network, this involves first sending commands to
-the modem to cause it to dial the remote system.  When the remote system
-answers, the local system usually has to supply a username and password,
-and then issue a command to invoke PPP software on the remote system.
-The ``chat'' program supplied with ppp-2.x provides a way to automate a
-dialog with the modem and the remote system.  This phase is not
-standardized; it is outside the scope of the PPP protocol
-specifications.
-
-@item
-Link Control Protocol (LCP) negotiation.  In this phase, the peers send
-LCP packets to each other to negotiate various parameters of the
-connection, such as the ACCM to be used in each direction, whether
-authentication is required, and whether or not to use various forms of
-compression.  When the peers reach agreement on these parameters, LCP is
-said to be ``up''.
-
-@item
-Authentication.  If one (or both) of the peers requires the other
-peer to authenticate itself, that occurs next.  If one of the peers
-cannot successfully authenticate itself, the other peer terminates the
-link.
-
-@item
-Network Control Protocol (NCP) negotiation.  PPP can potentially support
-several different network protocols, although IP is the only network
-protocol (NP) supported by the ppp-2.x package.  Each NP has an
-associated NCP defined for it, which is used to negotiate the specific
-parameters which affect that NP.  For example, the IP Control Protocol
-(IPCP) is used to negotiate the IP addresses for each end of the link,
-and whether the TCP header compression method described by Van Jacobsen
-in RFC 1144 (``VJ compression'') is to be used.
-
-@item
-Network communication.  When each NCP has successfully negotiated the
-parameters for its NP, that NCP is said to be ``up''.  At that point,
-the PPP link is made available for data traffic from that NP.  For
-example, when IPCP comes up, the PPP link is then available for carrying
-IP packets (which of course includes packets from those protocols which
-are layered above IP, such as TCP, UDP, etc.)
-
-@item
-Termination.  When the link is no longer required, it is terminated.
-Usually this involves an exchange of LCP packets so that one peer can
-notify the other that it is shutting down the link, enabling both peers
-to shut down in an orderly manner.  But of course there are occasions
-when the link terminates because the serial link is interrupted, for
-example, when a modem loses carrier and hangs up.
-
-@end enumerate
-
-The protocols in the PPP family are produced by the Point-to-Point
-Working Group of the Internet Engineering Task Force, and are specified
-in RFC (Request for Comments) documents, available by anonymous FTP from
-several sites.
-
-PPP is defined in several RFCs, in
-particular RFCs 1661, 1662, and 1334.  IPCP is defined in RFC 1332.
-Other RFCs describe the control protocols for other network protocols
-(e.g., DECnet, OSI, Appletalk).  RFCs are available by anonymous FTP
-from several sites including nic.ddn.mil, nnsc.nsf.net, nic.nordu.net,
-ftp.nisc.sri.com, and munnari.oz.au.
-
-@node PPP packet format, LCP negotiation, PPP Concepts, Introduction
-@section PPP packet format
-
-PPP transmits packets over the serial link using a simple encapsulation
-scheme.  First, a two-byte PPP Protocol field is inserted before the
-data to be sent.  The value in this field identifies
-which higher-level protocol (either a network protocol such as IP or a
-PPP control protocol such as LCP) should receive the data in the packet.
-By default, a one-byte Address field with the value 0xFF, and a one-byte
-Control field with the value 0x03, are inserted before the PPP Protocol
-field (apparently this is supposed to provide compatibility with HDLC,
-in case there is a synchronous to asynchronous converter in the serial
-link).
-
-On slow serial links, these fields can be compressed down to one byte in
-most cases.  The PPP Address and Control fields are compressed by simply
-omitting them (``address/control compression'').  The PPP Protocol field
-values are chosen so that bit 0 (the least-significant bit) of the first
-(most significant) byte is always 0, and bit 0 of the second byte is
-always 1.  The PPP Protocol field can be compressed by omitting the
-first byte, provided that it is 0 (``protocol compression'').  The
-values for this field are assigned so that the first byte is zero for
-all of the commonly-used network protocols.  For example, the PPP
-Protocol field value for IP is 0x21.
-
-For asynchronous serial links, which do not provide any packet framing
-or transparency, a further encapsulation is used as follows.  First a
-16-bit Frame Check Sequence (FCS) is computed over the packet to be
-sent, and appended as two bytes to the end of the packet.
-
-Then each byte of the packet is examined, and if it contains one of the
-characters which are to be escaped, it is replaced by a two byte
-sequence: the 0x7d character '}', followed by the character with bit 5
-inverted.  For example, the control-C character (0x03) could be replaced
-by the two-byte sequence 0x7d, 0x23 ('}#').  The 0x7d and 0x7e ('~')
-characters are always escaped, and the 0x5e ('^') character may not be
-escaped.
-
-Finally, a ``flag'' character (0x7e, '~') is inserted at the beginning
-and end of the packet to mark the packet boundaries.  The initial flag
-may be omitted if this packet immediately follows another packet, as the
-ending flag for the previous packet can serve as the beginning flag of
-this packet.
-
-@node LCP negotiation, IPCP negotiation, PPP packet format, Introduction
-@section LCP negotiation
-
-The LCP negotiation process actually involves two sets of negotiations,
-one for each direction of the PPP connection.  Thus A will send B
-packets (``Configure-Requests'') describing what characteristics A would
-like to have apply to the B -> A direction of the link, that is, to the
-packets that A will receive.  Similarly B will send A packets describing
-the characteristics it would like to have apply to the packets it will
-be receiving.  These characteristics need not necessarily be the same in
-both directions.
-
-The parameters which are negotiated for each direction of the connection
-using LCP are:
-
-@itemize @bullet
-@item
-Maximum Receive Unit (MRU): indicates the maximum packet size which we
-are prepared to receive (specifically the maximum size of the
-data portion of the packet).  The default value is 1500, but on
-slow serial links, smaller values give better response.  The choice of
-MRU is discussed below (see xxx).
-
-@item
-Async Control Character Map (ACCM): indicates the set of control
-characters (characters with ASCII values in the range 0 - 31) which we
-wish to receive in escaped form.  The default is that the sender should
-escape all characters in the range 0 - 31.
-
-@item
-Authentication Protocol: indicates which protocol we would like the peer
-to use to authenticate itself.  Common choices are the Password
-Authentication Protocol (PAP) and the Cryptographic Handshake
-Authentication Protocol (CHAP).
-
-@item
-Quality Protocol: indicates which protocol which we would like the peer
-to use to send us link quality reports.  The ppp-2.x package does not
-currently support link quality reports.
-
-@item
-Magic Number: a randomly-chosen number, different from the peer's magic
-number.  If we persistently receive our own magic number in the peer's
-configure-request packets, then we can conclude that the serial link is
-looped back.
-
-@item
-Protocol Field Compression: indicates that we wish the peer to compress
-the PPP Protocol field to one byte, where possible, in the packets it
-sends.
-
-@item
-Address/Control Field Compression: indicates that we wish the peer to
-compress the PPP Address/Control fields (by simply omitting them) in the
-packets it sends.
-@end itemize
-
-@node IPCP negotiation,  , LCP negotiation, Introduction
-@section IPCP negotiation
-
-The IPCP negotiation process is very similar to the LCP negotiation
-process, except that of course different parameters are negotiated.
-The parameters which are negotiated using IPCP are:
-
-@itemize @bullet
-@item
-IP Address: the IP address (32-bit host IP number) which we plan to use
-as the local address for our end of the link.
-
-@item
-TCP header compression: indicates (a) that we wish the peer to compress
-the TCP/IP headers of TCP/IP packets that it sends, using the Van
-Jacobson algorithm as described in RFC1144; (b) the maximum slot ID that
-we wish the peer to use, and (c) whether we are prepared to accept
-packets with the slot ID field compressed (omitted).
-
-With Van Jacobson (VJ) compression, the receiver and transmitter (for
-one direction of the connection) both keep a table, with a certain
-number of ``slots'', where each slot holds the TCP/IP header of the most
-recently transmitted packet for one TCP connection.  If a packet is to
-be transmitted for a TCP connection which does not have a slot currently
-allocated, the VJ scheme will allocate one of the slots and send the
-entire TCP/IP header, together with the slot number.  For many packets,
-there will be a slot already allocated for the TCP connection, and the
-VJ scheme will then often be able to replace the entire TCP/IP header
-with a much smaller compressed header (typically only 3 - 7 bytes)
-describing which fields of the TCP/IP header have changed, and by how
-much.  If there are many more active connections than slots, the
-efficiency of the VJ scheme will drop, because it will not be able to
-send compressed headers as often.
-
-Usually the compressed header includes a one-byte slot index, indicating
-which TCP connection the packet is for.  It is possible to reduce the
-header size by omitting the slot index when the packet has the same slot
-index as the previous packet.  However, this introduces a danger if the
-lower levels of the PPP software can sometimes drop damaged packets
-without informing the VJ decompressor, as it may then assume the wrong
-slot index for packets which have the slot index field omitted.  With
-the ppp-2.x software, however, the probability of this happening is
-generally very small (see xxx).
-
-@end itemize
-
-@node Installation, Configuration, Introduction, Top
-@chapter Installation
-
-Because ppp-2.x includes code which must be incorporated into the
-kernel, its installation process is necessarily quite heavily
-system-dependent.  In addition, you will require super-user privileges
-(root access) to install the code.
-
-Some systems provide a ``modload'' facility, which allows you to load
-new code into a running kernel without relinking the kernel or
-rebooting.  Under Solaris 2, SunOS 4.x, Linux, OSF/1 and NextStep, this
-is the recommended (or only) way to install the kernel portion of the
-ppp-2.x package.
-
-Under the remaining supported operating systems (NetBSD, FreeBSD,
-Ultrix), it is necessary to go through the process of creating a new
-kernel image and reboot.  (Note that NetBSD and FreeBSD have a modload
-facility, but ppp-2.x is currently not configured to take advantage of
-it.)
-
-Detailed installation instructions for each operating system are
-contained in the README files in the ppp-2.x distribution.  In general,
-the process involves executing the commands @samp{./configure},
-@samp{make} and (as root) @samp{make install} in the ppp-2.x
-distribution directory.  (The Linux port requires the installation of
-some header files before compiling; see README.linux for details.)
-
-@node Configuration, Security, Installation, Top
-@chapter Configuration
-
-Once the ppp-2.x software is installed, you need to configure your
-system for the particular PPP connections you wish to allow.  Typically,
-the elements you need to configure are:
-
-@itemize @bullet
-@item
-How the serial link is established and how pppd gets invoked.
-@item
-Setting up syslog to log messages from pppd to the console and/or
-system log files.
-@item
-Pppd options to be used.
-@item
-Authentication secrets to use in authenticating us to the peer
-and/or the peer to us.
-@item
-The IP addresses for each end of the link.
-@end itemize
-
-In most cases, the system you are configuring will either be a
-@dfn{client} system, actively initiating a PPP connection on user
-request, or it will be a @dfn{server} system, passively waiting for
-connections from client systems.  Other arrangements are possible, but
-the instructions in this system assume that you are configuring either a
-client or a server.
-
-These instructions also assume that the serial link involves a serial
-communications port (that is, a tty device), since pppd requires a
-serial port.
-
-@menu
-* Client machines::  
-* Server machines::  
-* Setting up syslog::           
-* Pppd options::                
-* Authentication secrets files::  
-* IP Addresses::                
-@end menu
-
-@node Client machines, Server machines, Configuration, Configuration
-@section Client machines
-
-On a client machine, the way that the user requests that a connection be
-established is by running pppd, either directly or through a shell
-script.  Pppd should be given the name of the serial port to use as an
-option.  In this mode, pppd will fork and detach itself from its
-controlling terminal, so that the shell will return to its prompt.  (If
-this behaviour is not desired, use the -detach option.)
-
-Usually, the connect option should also be used.  The connect option
-takes an argument which is a command to run to establish the serial link
-and invoke PPP software on the remote machine.  This command is run with
-its standard input and standard output connected to the serial port.
-Giving the connect option to pppd also has the side-effect of causing
-pppd to open the serial port without waiting for the modem carrier
-detect signal.
-
-The process of establishing the serial link often involves a dialog.  If
-the serial port is connected to a modem, we first need to send some
-commands to the modem to configure it and dial the remote system.  Often
-there is then a dialog with the remote system to supply a username and
-password.  The @file{chat} program supplied with the ppp-2.x package is
-useful for automating such dialogs.  Chat uses a @dfn{script} consisting
-of alternately strings to expect to receive on the serial port, and
-strings to send on the serial port.  The script can also specify strings
-which indicate an error and abort the dialog.
-
-@node Server machines, , Client machines, Configuration
-@section Server machines
-
-There are generally three ways in which a server machine can be set up
-to allow client machines to establish a PPP link:
-
-@enumerate
-@item
-Client machines log in as regular users (often via a serial port
-connected to a modem, but possibly through a telnet or rlogin session)
-and then run pppd as a shell command.
-@item
-Client machines log in using a username whose login shell is pppd
-or a script which runs pppd.
-@item
-Client machines connect to a serial port which has a pppd running
-permanently on it (instead of a "getty" or other program providing a
-login service).
-@end enumerate
-
-Method 1 is very simple to set up, and is useful where existing users of
-a system have remote machines (for example at home) from which they want
-to establish a PPP connection from time to time.  Methods 2 and 3
-possibly have a security advantage in that they do not allow PPP client
-systems access to a shell.  Method 2 allows regular logins and PPP
-connections on the same port, while with method 3, would-be crackers may
-well be frustrated (unless they speak fluent PPP).
-
-With any of these methods, I strongly recommend that you configure PPP
-to require authentication from the client, by including the `auth'
-option in the /etc/ppp/options file.
-
-@node Setting up syslog, , Server machines, Configuration
-@section Setting up syslog
-
-Pppd uses the @file{syslog} facility to report information about the
-state of the connection, as does @file{chat}.  It is useful to set up
-syslog to print some of these messages on the console, and to record
-most of them to a file.  The messages from pppd are logged with facility
-@samp{daemon} and one of three levels:
-@itemize @bullet
-@item
-@samp{notice} for messages about important events such as the
-connection becoming available for IP traffic and the local and remote IP
-addresses in use.
-@item
-@samp{info} for messages about less important events, such as
-detecting a modem hangup.
-@item
-@samp{debug} for messages which are of use in working out why the
-connection is not working properly.
-@end itemize
-
-The messages from chat are logged with facility @samp{local2} and level
-@samp{debug}.
-
-Syslog is controlled by the syslog configuration file
-@file{/etc/syslog.conf}.  Generally the standard configuration will log
-facility @samp{daemon} messages with level @samp{notice} and above to a
-system log file such as @file{/var/log/syslog} (the name may vary on
-different systems).  I find it useful to have the notice level messages
-from pppd displayed on the console, and all messages from pppd and chat
-logged to a file such as @file{/etc/ppp/log}.  To achieve this,
-find the line in /etc/syslog.conf which has /dev/console
-on the right-hand side, and add `daemon.notice' on the left.  This
-line should end up something like this:
-
-@example
-*.err;kern.debug;auth.notice;mail.crit;daemon.notice    /dev/console
-@end example
-
-And add a line like this:
-
-@example
-daemon,local2.debug                                     /etc/ppp/log
-@end example
-
-The space between the left and right hand sides is one or more tabs, not
-spaces, and there are no tabs or spaces at the beginning of the line.
-
-You will need to create an empty @file{/etc/ppp/log} file; syslogd will
-not create it.  Once you have modified @file{/etc/syslog.conf}, you need
-to either reboot or notify syslogd to re-read the file.  On most
-systems, you notify syslogd by sending it a SIGHUP signal.  Syslogd's
-process ID is usually stored in a file such as @file{/etc/syslogd.pid}
-or @file{/var/run/syslog.pid}.  Thus you can notify syslogd to re-read
-the file by executing a command such as:
-
-@example
-kill -HUP `cat /etc/syslogd.pid`
-@end example
-
-@node Pppd options, , Setting up syslog, Configuration
-@section Pppd options
-
-@node Authentication secrets files, , Pppd options, Configuration
-@section Authentication secrets files
-
-@node IP Addresses,  , Authentication secrets files, Configuration
-@section IP Addresses
-
-@node Security, Compression, Configuration, Top
-@chapter Security
-
-@node Compression,  , Security, Top
-@chapter Compression
-
-@bye