Updated Solaris-related READMEs for the current code.
authorJames Carlson <carlsonj@workingcode.com>
Sat, 7 Sep 2002 06:07:48 +0000 (06:07 +0000)
committerJames Carlson <carlsonj@workingcode.com>
Sat, 7 Sep 2002 06:07:48 +0000 (06:07 +0000)
README
README.sol2

diff --git a/README b/README
index 9398929a2238247941a8ac7014a91732f103013c..67d12661298baa341d2e6a0ddcee74c6775096b6 100644 (file)
--- a/README
+++ b/README
@@ -41,7 +41,7 @@ that system.  The supported systems, and the corresponding README
 files, are:
 
        Linux                           README.linux
-       Solaris 2                       README.sol2
+       Solaris                         README.sol2
        SunOS 4.x                       README.sunos4
 
 In each case you start by running the ./configure script.  This works
@@ -145,7 +145,7 @@ If you find bugs in this package, please report them to the maintainer
 for the port for the operating system you are using:
 
 Linux                  Paul Mackerras <paulus@linuxcare.com>
-Solaris 2              James Carlson <james.d.carlson@east.sun.com>
+Solaris                        James Carlson <james.d.carlson@east.sun.com>
 SunOS 4.x              Adi Masputra <adi.masputra@sun.com>
 
 
@@ -165,4 +165,4 @@ The primary site for releases of this software is:
        ftp://linuxcare.com.au/pub/ppp/
 
 
-($Id: README,v 1.24 2001/03/09 00:53:57 paulus Exp $)
+($Id: README,v 1.25 2002/09/07 06:07:48 carlsonj Exp $)
index 4c862208f41d664de54f25d29c1874773bd3c799..742166480c6e9f2981172efbe624570a685839e2 100644 (file)
@@ -1,8 +1,8 @@
-This file describes the installation process for ppp-2.3 on systems
-running Solaris 2.  The Solaris 2 and SVR4 ports share a lot of code
-but are not identical.  The STREAMS kernel modules and driver for
-Solaris 2 are in the svr4 directory (and use some code from the
-modules directory).
+This file describes the installation process for ppp-2.4 on systems
+running Solaris.  The Solaris and SVR4 ports share a lot of code but
+are not identical.  The STREAMS kernel modules and driver for Solaris
+are in the solaris directory (and use some code from the modules
+directory).
 
 NOTE: Although the kernel driver and modules have been designed to
 operate correctly on SMP systems, they have not been extensively
@@ -15,64 +15,105 @@ Installation.
 *************
 
 1. Run the configure script and make the user-level programs and the
-kernel modules.
+   kernel modules.
 
        ./configure
        make
 
-If you wish to use gcc (or another compiler) instead of Sun's cc, edit
-the svr4/Makedefs file and uncomment the definition of CC.  You can
-also change the options passed to the C compiler by editing the COPTS
-definition.
+    The configure script will automatically find Sun's cc if it's in
+    the standard location (/opt/SUNWspro/bin/cc).  If you do not have
+    Sun's WorkShop compiler, configure will attempt to use 'gcc'.  If
+    this is found and you have a 64 bit kernel, it will check that gcc
+    accepts the "-m64" option, which is required to build kernel
+    modules.
+
+    You should not have to edit the Makefiles for most ordinary cases.
 
 2. Install the programs and kernel modules: as root, do
 
        make install
 
-This installs pppd, chat and pppstats in /usr/local/bin and the kernel
-modules in /kernel/drv and /kernel/strmod, and creates the /etc/ppp
-directory and populates it with default configuration files.  You can
-change the installation directories by editing svr4/Makedefs.
+    This installs pppd, chat and pppstats in /usr/local/bin and the
+    kernel modules in /kernel/drv and /kernel/strmod, and creates the
+    /etc/ppp directory and populates it with default configuration
+    files.  You can change the installation directories by editing
+    solaris/Makedefs.  If you have a 64 bit kernel, the 64-bit drivers
+    are installed in /kernel/drv/sparcv9 and /kernel/strmod/sparcv9.
 
-If your system normally has only one network interface, the default
-Solaris 2 system startup scripts will disable IP forwarding in the IP
-kernel module.  This will prevent the remote machine from using the
-local machine as a gateway to access other hosts.  The solution is to
-create an /etc/ppp/ip-up script containing something like this:
+    If your system normally has only one network interface at boot
+    time, the default Solaris system startup scripts will disable IP
+    forwarding in the IP kernel module.  This will prevent the remote
+    machine from using the local machine as a gateway to access other
+    hosts.  The solution is to create an /etc/ppp/ip-up script
+    containing something like this:
 
        #!/bin/sh
        /usr/sbin/ndd -set /dev/ip ip_forwarding 1
 
-See the man page for ip(7p) for details.
+    See the man page for ip(7p) for details.
+
+Integrated pppd
+***************
+
+  Solaris 8 07/01 (Update 5) and later have an integrated version of
+  pppd, known as "Solaris PPP 4.0," and is based on ppp-2.4.0.  This
+  version comes with the standard Solaris software distribution and is
+  supported by Sun.  It is fully tested in 64-bit and SMP modes, and
+  with bundled and unbundled synchronous drivers.  Solaris 8 10/01
+  (Update 6) and later includes integrated PPPoE client and server
+  support, with kernel-resident data handling.  See pppd(1M).
+
+  The feature is part of the regular full installation, and is
+  provided by these packages:
+
+       SUNWpppd        - 32-bit mode kernel drivers
+       SUNWpppdr       - root-resident /etc/ppp config samples
+       SUNWpppdu       - /usr/bin/pppd itself, plus chat
+       SUNWpppdx       - 64-bit mode kernel drivers
+       SUNWpppdt       - PPPoE support
+       SUNWpppg        - GPL'd optional 'pppdump' and plugins
+       SUNWpppgS       - Source for GPL'd optional features
+
+  Use the open source version of pppd if you wish to recompile to add
+  new features or to experiment with the code.  Production systems,
+  however, should run the Sun-supplied version, if at all possible.
+
+  You can run both versions on a single system if you wish.  The
+  Solaris PPP 4.0 interfaces are named "spppN," while this open source
+  version names its interfaces as "pppN".  The STREAMS modules are
+  similarly separated.  The Sun-supplied pppd lives in /usr/bin/pppd,
+  while the open source version installs (by default) in
+  /usr/local/bin/pppd.
 
 Dynamic STREAMS Re-Plumbing Support.
 ************************************
 
-Solaris 8 includes dynamic re-plumbing support. With this, modules
-below ip can be inserted, or removed, without having the ip stream be
-unplumbed, and re-plumbed again. All states in ip for an interface
-will therefore now be preserved. Users can install (or upgrade)
-modules like firewall, bandwidth manager, cache manager, tunneling,
-etc., without shutting the machine down.
-
-To support this, ppp driver now uses /dev/udp instead of /dev/ip for
-the ip stream. The interface stream (where ip module pushed on top of
-ppp) is then I_PLINK'ed below the ip stream. /dev/udp is used because
-STREAMS will not let a driver be PLINK'ed under itself, and /dev/ip is
-typically the driver at the bottom of the tunneling interfaces
-stream.  The mux ids of the ip streams are then added using
-SIOCSxIFMUXID ioctl.
-
-Users will be able to see the modules on the interface stream by, for
-example:
-
-    pikapon% ifconfig ppp modlist
+  Solaris 8 (and later) includes dynamic re-plumbing support.  With
+  this feature, modules below ip can be inserted, or removed, without
+  having the ip stream be unplumbed, and re-plumbed again.  All state
+  in ip for the interface will be preserved as modules are added or
+  removed.  Users can install (or upgrade) modules such as firewall,
+  bandwidth manager, cache manager, tunneling, etc., without shutting
+  the interface down.
+
+  To support this, ppp driver now uses /dev/udp instead of /dev/ip for
+  the ip stream. The interface stream (where ip module pushed on top
+  of ppp) is then I_PLINK'ed below the ip stream. /dev/udp is used
+  because STREAMS will not let a driver be PLINK'ed under itself, and
+  /dev/ip is typically the driver at the bottom of the tunneling
+  interfaces stream.  The mux ids of the ip streams are then added
+  using SIOCSxIFMUXID ioctl.
+
+  Users will be able to see the modules on the interface stream by,
+  for example:
+
+    pikapon# ifconfig ppp modlist
     0 ip
     1 ppp
 
-Or arbitrarily if bandwidth manager and firewall modules are installed:
+  Or arbitrarily if bandwidth manager and firewall modules are installed:
 
-    pikapon% ifconfig hme0 modlist
+    pikapon# ifconfig hme0 modlist
     0 arp
     1 ip
     2 ipqos
@@ -82,50 +123,52 @@ Or arbitrarily if bandwidth manager and firewall modules are installed:
 Snoop Support.
 **************
 
-This version includes support for /usr/sbin/snoop. Tests has been done
-on both Solaris 7 and 8. Only IPv4 and IPv6 packets will be sent up to
-stream(s) marked as promiscuous, e.g, snoop et al.
+  This version includes support for /usr/sbin/snoop.  Tests have been
+  done on Solaris 7 through 9. Only IPv4 and IPv6 packets will be sent
+  up to stream(s) marked as promiscuous (i.e., those used by snoop).
 
-Users will be able to see the packets on the ppp interface by, for example:
+  Users will be able to see the packets on the ppp interface by, for
+  example:
 
     snoop -d ppp0
 
-See the man page for snoop(1M) for details.
+  See the man page for snoop(1M) for details.
 
 IPv6 Support.
 *************
 
-This is for Solaris 8 and later.
+  This is for Solaris 8 and later.
 
-This version has been tested under Solaris 8 running IPv6. As of now,
-interoperability testing has only been done between Solaris machines
-in terms of the IPV6 NCP. An additional command line option for the
-pppd daemon has been added: ipv6cp-use-persistent.
+  This version has been tested under Solaris 8 and 9 running IPv6.
+  Interoperability testing has only been done between Solaris machines
+  in terms of the IPV6 NCP.  An additional command line option for the
+  pppd daemon has been added: ipv6cp-use-persistent.
 
-By default, compilation for IPv6 support is not enabled.  Uncomment
-the necessary lines in pppd/Makefile.sol2 to enable it. Once done, the
-quickest way to get IPv6 running is to add the following somewhere in
-the command line option:
+  By default, compilation for IPv6 support is not enabled.  Uncomment
+  the necessary lines in pppd/Makefile.sol2 to enable it.  Once done,
+  the quickest way to get IPv6 running is to add the following
+  somewhere in the command line option:
 
        +ipv6 ipv6cp-use-persistent
 
-The persistent id for the link-local address was added to conform to
-RFC 2472; such that if there's an EUI-48 available, use that to make
-up the EUI-64.  As of now, the Solaris implementation extracts the
-EUI-48 id from the Ethernet's MAC address (the ethernet interface
-needs to be up).  Future works might support other ways of obtaining a
-unique yet persistent id, such as EEPROM serial numbers, etc.
-
-There need not be any up/down scripts for ipv6, e.g. /etc/ppp/ipv6-up
-or /etc/ppp/ipv6-down, to trigger IPv6 neighbor discovery for auto
-configuration and routing.  The in.ndpd daemon will perform all of the
-necessary jobs in the background. /etc/inet/ndpd.conf can be further
-customized to enable the machine as an IPv6 router. See the man page
-for in.ndpd(1M) and ndpd.conf(4) for details.
-
-Below is a sample output of "ifconfig -a" with persistent link-local
-address.  Note the UNNUMBERED flag is set because hme0 and ppp0 both
-have identical link-local IPv6 addresses:
+  The persistent id for the link-local address was added to conform to
+  RFC 2472; such that if there's an EUI-48 available, use that to make
+  up the EUI-64.  As of now, the Solaris implementation extracts the
+  EUI-48 id from the Ethernet's MAC address (the ethernet interface
+  needs to be up).  Future work might support other ways of obtaining
+  a unique yet persistent id, such as EEPROM serial numbers, etc.
+
+  There need not be any up/down scripts for ipv6,
+  e.g. /etc/ppp/ipv6-up or /etc/ppp/ipv6-down, to trigger IPv6
+  neighbor discovery for auto configuration and routing.  The in.ndpd
+  daemon will perform all of the necessary jobs in the
+  background. /etc/inet/ndpd.conf can be further customized to enable
+  the machine as an IPv6 router. See the man page for in.ndpd(1M) and
+  ndpd.conf(4) for details.
+
+  Below is a sample output of "ifconfig -a" with persistent link-local
+  address.  Note the UNNUMBERED flag is set because hme0 and ppp0 both
+  have identical link-local IPv6 addresses:
 
 lo0: flags=1000849<UP,LOOPBACK,RUNNING,MULTICAST,IPv4> mtu 8232 index 1
         inet 127.0.0.1 netmask ff000000 
@@ -148,73 +191,70 @@ ppp0: flags=10008d1<UP,POINTOPOINT,RUNNING,NOARP,MULTICAST,IPv4> mtu 1500 index
 ppp0: flags=2202851<UP,POINTOPOINT,RUNNING,MULTICAST,UNNUMBERED,NONUD,IPv6> mtu 1500 index 12
         inet6 fe80::a00:20ff:fe8d:38c1/10 --> fe80::a00:20ff:fe7a:24fb
 
-Note also that a plumbed ipv6 interface stream will exist throughout
-the entire PPP session in the case where the peer rejects IPV6CP,
-which further causes the interface state to stay down. Unplumbing will
-happen when the daemon exits. This is done by design and is not a bug.
+  Note also that a plumbed ipv6 interface stream will exist throughout
+  the entire PPP session in the case where the peer rejects IPV6CP,
+  which further causes the interface state to stay down. Unplumbing
+  will happen when the daemon exits. This is done by design and is not
+  a bug.
 
 64-bit Support.
 ***************
 
-This version has been tested under Solaris 7 (and Solaris 8 ) in both
-32- and 64-bits environments (Ultra class machines).  Installing the
-package by executing "make install" will result in additional files
-residing in /kernel/drv/sparcv9 and /kernel/strmod/sparcv9
-subdirectories.
+  This version has been tested under Solaris 7 through 9 in both 32-
+  and 64-bit environments (Ultra class machines).  Installing the
+  package by executing "make install" will result in additional files
+  residing in /kernel/drv/sparcv9 and /kernel/strmod/sparcv9
+  subdirectories.
 
-64-bit modules and driver have been compiled and tested using Sun's cc.
+  64-bit modules and driver have been compiled and tested using Sun's
+  cc and gcc.
 
 Synchronous Serial Support.
 ***************************
 
-This version has working but limited support for the on-board
-synchronous HDLC interfaces. It has been tested with the /dev/se_hdlc
-and /dev/zsh drivers.  Synchronous mode was tested with a Cisco
-router.
+  This version has working but limited support for the on-board
+  synchronous HDLC interfaces.  It has been tested with the
+  /dev/se_hdlc, /dev/zsh, HSI/S, and HSI/P drivers.  Synchronous mode
+  was tested with a Cisco router.
 
-There ppp daemon does not directly support controlling the serial
-interface.  It relies on the /usr/sbin/syncinit command to initialize
-HDLC mode and clocking.
+  The ppp daemon does not directly support controlling the serial
+  interface.  It relies on the /usr/sbin/syncinit command to
+  initialize HDLC mode and clocking.
 
-Some bugs remain: large sized frames are not sent/received properly,
-and may be related to the IP mtu.  This may be due to bugs in pppd
-itself, bugs in Solaris or the serial drivers.  The /dev/zsh driver
-seems more larger and can send/receive larger frames than the
-/dev/se_hdlc driver. There is a confirmed bug with NRZ/NRZI mode in
-the /dev/se_hdlc driver, and Solaris patch 104596-11 is needed to
-correct it. (However this patch seems to introduce other serial
-problems. If you don't apply the patch, the workaround is to change
-the nrzi mode to yes or no, whichever works)
+  There is a confirmed bug with NRZ/NRZI mode in the /dev/se_hdlc
+  driver, and Solaris patch 104596-11 is needed to correct it.
+  (However this patch seems to introduce other serial problems.  If
+  you don't apply the patch, the workaround is to change the nrzi mode
+  to yes or no, whichever works.)
 
-How to start pppd with synchronous support:
+  How to start pppd with synchronous support:
 
-#!/bin/sh
+       #!/bin/sh
 
-local=1.1.1.1   # your ip address here
-baud=38400     # needed, but ignored by serial driver
+       local=1.1.1.1   # your ip address here
+       baud=38400      # needed, but ignored by serial driver
 
-# Change to the correct serial driver/port
-#dev=/dev/zsh0
-dev=/dev/se_hdlc0
+       # Change to the correct serial driver/port
+       #dev=/dev/zsh0
+       dev=/dev/se_hdlc0
  
-# Change the driver, nrzi mode, speed and clocking to match your setup
-# This configuration is for external clocking from the DCE
-connect="syncinit se_hdlc0 nrzi=no speed=64000 txc=rxc rxc=rxc"
+       # Change the driver, nrzi mode, speed and clocking to match
+       # your setup.
+       # This configuration is for external clocking from the DCE
+       connect="syncinit se_hdlc0 nrzi=no speed=64000 txc=rxc rxc=rxc"
  
-/usr/sbin/pppd $dev sync $baud novj noauth $local: connect "$connect"
-
-
-Sample Cisco router config excerpt:
-
-!
-! Cisco router setup as DCE with RS-232 DCE cable
-! 
-!         
-interface Serial0
- ip address 1.1.1.2 255.255.255.0
- encapsulation ppp
- clockrate 64000
- no nrzi-encoding
- no shutdown
-!         
-
+       /usr/sbin/pppd $dev sync $baud novj noauth $local: connect "$connect"
+
+  Sample Cisco router config excerpt:
+
+       !
+       ! Cisco router setup as DCE with RS-232 DCE cable
+       ! 
+       !         
+       interface Serial0
+        ip address 1.1.1.2 255.255.255.0
+        encapsulation ppp
+        clockrate 64000
+        no nrzi-encoding
+        no shutdown
+       !