pppd: Fix man page description of case when remote IP address isn't known
[ppp.git] / scripts / README
1 This directory contains a set of scripts which have been used on Linux
2 as well as Solaris 2.x systems to initiate or maintain a connection 
3 with PPP.  The files in this directory were contributed by Al Longyear 
4 (longyear@netcom.com) and Adi Masputra (adi.masputra@sun.com)
5
6 ------------------------------------------------------------------------
7
8 1. README
9
10 This file. You are reading it. It is just documentation.
11
12 ------------------------------------------------------------------------
13
14 2. ppp-on
15
16 This script will initiate a connection to the PPP system. It will run
17 the chat program with the connection script as a parameter. This is a
18 possible security hole. However, it is simple. It is meant to replace
19 the previous version of ppp-on which was not very functional.
20
21 The ppp-on script has entries for the account name, password, IP
22 addresses, and telephone numbers. The parameters are passed to the
23 pppd process and, then in turn, to the second part of the connect
24 script, as a set of environment variables.
25
26 Please make sure that you put the full path name to the ppp-on-dialer
27 script in the reference to it in ppp-on.
28
29 ------------------------------------------------------------------------
30
31 3. ppp-on-dialer
32
33 This is the second part to the simple calling script, ppp-on.  It
34 executes the chat program to connect the user with a standard UNIX
35 style getty/login connection sequence.
36
37 ------------------------------------------------------------------------
38
39 4. callback
40
41 This script may be used in lieu of the ppp-on-dialer to permit the
42 common modem callback sequence. You may need to make changes to the
43 expected prompt string for the modem.
44
45 The script works by disabling the system's detection of the DCD
46 condition and working on the modem status message "NO CARRIER" which
47 is generated when the modem disconnects.
48
49 It is crude. It does work for my modem connection. Use as you see fit.
50
51 ------------------------------------------------------------------------
52
53 5. redialer
54
55 The redialer script is a replacement for the ppp-on-dialer script.  It
56 will do 'attack dialing' or 'demon dialing' of one or more telephone
57 numbers. The first number which responds will be used for a
58 connection.
59
60 There is a limit of ten attempts and a 15 second delay between dialing
61 attempts. Both values are set in the script.
62
63 ------------------------------------------------------------------------
64
65 6. ppp-off
66
67 This is a script which will terminate the active ppp connection. Use
68 as either "ppp-off" to terminate ppp0, or "ppp-off <device>" to
69 terminate the connection on <device>. For example, "ppp-off ppp2" will
70 terminate the ppp2 connection.
71
72 ------------------------------------------------------------------------
73
74 7. secure-card
75
76 This script was written by Jim Isaacson <jcisaac@crl.com>. It is a script
77 for the 'expect' programming language used with Tcl. You need to have
78 expect and Tcl installed before this script may be used.
79
80 This script will operate with a device marketed under the name "SecureCARD".
81 This little device is mated with its controller. On the credit card size
82 device, there is a sequence number which changes on a random basis. In order
83 for you to connect you need to enter a fixed portion of your account name
84 and the number which is displayed on this card device. The number must match
85 the value at the controller in order for the account name to be used.
86
87 The problem is that chat uses fixed response strings. In addition, the
88 timing for running the script may prevent the use of a script that reads the
89 value before it starts the dial sequence. What was needed was a script which
90 asked the user at the user's console at the time that it is needed.
91
92 This led to the use of expect.
93
94 ------------------------------------------------------------------------
95
96 8. ppp-on-rsh
97
98 This script will initiate a PPP connection to a remote machine using rsh.
99 This is implemented by creating a master/slave pseudo-tty with the slave 
100 pointing to rsh, specifically with the 'pty' and 'notty' options of pppd. 
101 It is assumed that the remote machine contains some sort of trust 
102 mechanisms (such as ~/.rhosts, et al) to allow the local machine to 
103 connect via rsh as root.
104
105 ------------------------------------------------------------------------
106
107 9. ppp-on-ssh
108
109 This script will initiate a PPP connection to a remote machine using the 
110 secure shell, or ssh. I've only tested this on ssh 1.x, so those of you 
111 who are running ssh 2.x mahy need to modify the ssh options slightly.
112 This is implemented by creating a master/slave pseudo-ttyt with the slave 
113 pointing to ssh, specifically with the 'pty' and 'notty' options of pppd. 
114 It is assumed that the remote machine can accept the ssh connection from 
115 the local host, in the sense that all ssh authentication mechanisms have 
116 been properly configured, so that a remote root user can open a ssh 
117 connection.
118
119 ------------------------------------------------------------------------
120
121 10. options-rsh-loc & options-rsh-rem
122
123 These options files accompany the ppp-on-rsh script mentioned above. In 
124 theory, you'd want to copy the options-rsh-rem to the remote machine where 
125 in.rshd is running. The only extra option required on the remote machine 
126 options file is the 'notty' option. In addition, all ASCII control characters 
127 [0x00 to 0x1f], plus 0xff, are escaped. This may need to be modified 
128 depending on the rsh (or pseudo-tty) implementation which may differ across 
129 platforms, for further optimizations.
130
131 ------------------------------------------------------------------------
132
133 11. options-ssh-loc & options-ssh-rem
134
135 These options files accompany the ppp-on-ssh script mentioned above. I've
136 only tested this on ssh 1.x, so those of you who are running ssh 2.x need
137 to modify the ssh options slightly. In theory, you'd want to copy the 
138 options-ssh-rem to the remote machine where sshd daemon is running. The only 
139 extra options required on the remote machine options file is the 'notty' 
140 option. In addition, all ASCII control characters [0x00 to 0x1f], plus 0xff, 
141 are escaped. This may need to be modified depending on the ssh (or 
142 pseudo-tty) implementation which may differ across platforms, for further 
143 optimizations.