sifdefaultroute now gets both local and remote addresses
[ppp.git] / README.MSCHAP80
1 PPP Client Support for Microsoft's CHAP-80
2 ==========================================
3
4 Eric Rosenquist          rosenqui@strataware.com
5 (updated by Paul Mackerras)
6 (updated by Al Longyear)
7
8 INTRODUCTION
9
10 Microsoft has introduced an extension to the Challenge/Handshake
11 Authentication Protocol (CHAP) which avoids storing cleartext
12 passwords on a server.  (Unfortunately, this is not as secure as it
13 sounds, because the encrypted password stored on a server can be used
14 by a bogus client to gain access to the server just as easily as if
15 the password were stored in cleartext.)  The details of the Microsoft
16 extensions can be found in the document:
17
18     <ftp://ftp.microsoft.com/developr/rfc/chapexts.txt>
19
20 In short, MS-CHAP is identified as <auth chap 80> since the hex value
21 of 80 is used to designate Microsoft's scheme.  Standard PPP CHAP uses
22 a value of 5.  If you enable PPP debugging with the "debug" option and
23 see something like the following in your logs, the remote server is
24 requesting MS-CHAP:
25
26   rcvd [LCP ConfReq id=0x2 <asyncmap 0x0> <auth chap 80> <magic 0x46a3>]
27                                            ^^^^^^^^^^^^
28
29 The standard pppd implementation will indicate its lack of support for
30 MS-CHAP by NAKing it:
31
32   sent [LCP ConfNak id=0x2 <auth chap 05>]
33
34 Windows NT Server systems are often configured to "Accept only
35 Microsoft Authentication" (this is intended to enhance security).  Up
36 until now, that meant that you couldn't use this version of PPPD to
37 connect to such a system.  I've managed to get a client-only
38 implementation of MS-CHAP working; it will authenticate itself to
39 another system using MS-CHAP, but if you're using PPPD as a dial-in
40 server, you won't be able to use MS-CHAP to authenticate the clients.
41 This would not be a lot of extra work given that the framework is in
42 place, but I didn't need it myself so I didn't implement it.
43
44
45 BUILDING THE PPPD
46
47 MS-CHAP uses a combination of MD4 hashing and DES encryption for
48 authentication.  You'll need to get Eric Young's libdes library in
49 order to use my MS-CHAP extensions.  You can find it in:
50
51 ftp://ftp.funet.fi/pub/crypt/mirrors/ftp.psy.uq.oz.au/DES/libdes-3.06.tar.gz
52
53 Australian residents can get libdes from Eric Young's site:
54
55 ftp://ftp.psy.uq.oz.au/pub/Crypto/DES/libdes-3.06.tar.gz
56
57 It is also available on many other sites (ask Archie).
58
59 I used libdes-3.06, but hopefully anything newer than that will work
60 also.  Get the library, build and test it on your system, and install
61 it somewhere (typically /usr/local/lib and /usr/local/include).
62
63 You should now be ready to (re)compile the PPPD.  Go to the pppd
64 subdirectory and make sure the Makefile contains "-DCHAPMS" in the
65 CFLAGS or COMPILE_FLAGS macro, and that the LIBS macro (or LDADD for
66 BSD systems) contains "-ldes".  Depending on your system and where the
67 DES library was installed, you may also need to alter the include and
68 library paths used by your compiler.
69
70 Do a "make clean" and then a "make" to rebuild pppd.  Assuming all
71 goes well, install the new pppd and move on to the CONFIGURATION
72 section.
73
74
75 CONFIGURATION
76
77 If you've never used PPPD with CHAP before, read the man page (type
78 "man pppd") and read the description in there.  Basically, you need to
79 edit the "chap-secrets" file typically named /etc/ppp/chap-secrets.
80 This should contain the following two lines for each system with which
81 you use CHAP (with no leading blanks):
82
83     RemoteHost  Account     Secret
84     Account     RemoteHost  Secret
85
86 Note that you need both lines and that item 1 and 2 are swapped in the
87 second line.  I'm not sure why you need it twice, but it works and I didn't
88 have time to look into it further.  The "RemoteHost" is a somewhat
89 arbitrary name for the remote Windows NT system you're dialing.  It doesn't
90 have to match the NT system's name, but it *does* have to match what you
91 use with the "remotename" parameter.  The "Account" is the Windows NT
92 account name you have been told to use when dialing, and the "Secret" is
93 the password for that account.  For example, if your service provider calls
94 their machine "DialupNT" and tells you your account and password are
95 "customer47" and "foobar", add the following to your chap-secrets file:
96
97     DialupNT    customer47  foobar
98     customer47  DialupNT    foobar
99
100 The only other thing you need to do for MS-CHAP (compared to normal CHAP)
101 is to always use the "remotename" option, either on the command line or in
102 your "options" file (see the pppd man page for details).  In the case of
103 the above example, you would need to use the following command line:
104
105     pppd name customer47 remotename DialupNT <other options>
106
107 or add:
108
109     name customer47
110     remotename DialupNT
111
112 to your PPPD "options" file.
113
114 The "remotename" option is required for MS-CHAP since Microsoft PPP servers
115 don't send their system name in the CHAP challenge packet.
116
117
118 E=691 (AUTHENTICATION_FAILURE) ERRORS WHEN YOU HAVE THE VALID SECRET (PASSWORD)
119
120 If your RAS server is not the domain controller and is not a 'stand-alone'
121 server then it must make a query to the domain controller for your domain.
122
123 You need to specify the domain name with the user name when you attempt to
124 use this type of a configuration. The domain name is specified with the
125 local name in the chap-secrets file and with the option for the 'name'
126 parameter.
127
128 For example, the previous example would become:
129
130     DialupNT            domain\\customer47   foobar
131     domain\\customer47  DialupNT             foobar
132
133 and
134
135     pppd name 'domain\\customer47' remotename DialupNT <other options>
136
137 or add:
138
139     name domain\\customer47
140     remotename DialupNT
141
142 when the Windows NT domain name is simply called 'domain'.
143
144
145 TROUBLESHOOTING
146
147 Assuming that everything else has been configured correctly for PPP and
148 CHAP, the MS-CHAP-specific problems you're likely to encounter are mostly
149 related to your Windows NT account and its settings.  A Microsoft server
150 returns error codes in its CHAP response.  The following are extracted from
151 Microsoft's "chapexts.txt" file referenced above:
152
153  646 ERROR_RESTRICTED_LOGON_HOURS
154  647 ERROR_ACCT_DISABLED
155  648 ERROR_PASSWD_EXPIRED
156  649 ERROR_NO_DIALIN_PERMISSION
157  691 ERROR_AUTHENTICATION_FAILURE
158  709 ERROR_CHANGING_PASSWORD
159
160 You'll see these in your pppd log as a line similar to:
161
162    Remote message: E=649 R=0
163
164 The "E=" is the error number from the table above, and the "R=" flag
165 indicates whether the error is transient and the client should retry.  If
166 you consistently get error 691, then either you're using the wrong account
167 name/password, or the DES library or MD4 hashing (in md4.c) aren't working
168 properly.  Verify your account name and password (use a Windows NT or
169 Windows 95 system to dial-in if you have one available).  If that checks
170 out, test the DES library with the "destest" program included with the DES
171 library.  If DES checks out, the md4.c routines are probably failing
172 (system byte ordering may be a problem) or my code is screwing up.  I've
173 only got access to a Linux system, so you're on your own for anything else.
174
175 If everything compiles cleanly, but fails at authentication time, then
176 it might be a case of the MD4 or DES code screwing up.  The following
177 small program can be used to test the MS-CHAP code to see if it
178 produces a known response:
179
180 -----------------
181 #include <stdio.h>
182
183 #include "pppd.h"
184 #include "chap.h"
185 #include "chap_ms.h"
186
187 int main(argc, argv)
188     int     argc;
189     char    *argv[0];
190 {
191     u_char          challenge[8];
192     int             challengeInt[sizeof(challenge)];
193     chap_state      cstate;
194     int             i;
195
196     if (argc != 3) {
197         fprintf(stderr, "Usage: %s <16-hexchar challenge> <password>\n",
198         argv[0]); exit(1);
199     }
200
201     sscanf(argv[1], "%2x%2x%2x%2x%2x%2x%2x%2x",
202            challengeInt + 0, challengeInt + 1, challengeInt + 2,
203            challengeInt + 3, challengeInt + 4, challengeInt + 5,
204            challengeInt + 6, challengeInt + 7);
205
206     for (i = 0; i < sizeof(challenge); i++)
207         challenge[i] = (u_char)challengeInt[i];
208
209     ChapMS(&cstate, challenge, sizeof(challenge), argv[2], strlen(argv[2]));
210     printf("Response length is %d, response is:", cstate.resp_length);
211
212     for (i = 0; i < cstate.resp_length; i++) {
213         if (i % 8 == 0)
214             putchar('\n');
215         printf("%02X ", (unsigned int)cstate.response[i]);
216     }
217
218     putchar('\n');
219
220     exit(0);
221 }
222 -------------
223
224 This needs to link against chap_ms.o, md4.o, and the DES library.  When 
225 you run it with the command line:
226
227  $ testchap 00000000000000000000000000000000 hello
228
229 it should output the following:
230
231  Response length is 49, response is:
232  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
233  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
234  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
235  F4 D9 9D AF 82 64 DC 3C
236  53 F9 BC 92 14 B5 5D 9E
237  78 C4 21 48 9D B7 A8 B4
238  01
239
240 if not, then either the DES library is not working, the MD4 code isn't 
241 working, or there are some problems with the port of the code in 
242 chap_ms.c.
243
244
245 STILL TO DO
246
247 A site using only MS-CHAP to authenticate has no need to store cleartext
248 passwords in the "chap-secrets" file.  A utility that spits out the ASCII
249 hex MD4 hash of a given password would be nice, and would allow that hash
250 to be used in chap-secrets in place of the password.  The code to do this
251 could quite easily be lifted from chap_ms.c (you have to convert the
252 password to Unicode before hashing it).  The chap_ms.c file would also have
253 to be changed to recognize a password hash (16 binary bytes == 32 ASCII hex
254 characters) and skip the hashing stage.
255
256 A server implementation would allow MS-CHAP to be used with Windows NT and
257 Windows 95 clients for enhanced security.  Some new command-line options
258 would be required, as would code to generate the Challenge packet and
259 verify the response.  Most of the helper functions are in place, so this
260 shouldn't be too hard for someone to add.