crypto/shachain/tools: update to new rbuf API.
[ccan] / ccan / crypto / shachain / design.txt
1 Efficient Chains Of Unpredictable Numbers
2 =========================================
3
4 The Problem
5 -----------
6
7 The Lightning Network wants a chain of (say 1 million) unguessable 256
8 bit values; we generate them and send them one at a time to a remote
9 node.  We don't want the remote node to have to store all the values,
10 so it's better if they can derive them once they see them.
11
12 A Simple Solution
13 -----------------
14
15 A simple system is a hash chain: we select a random seed value, the
16 hash it 1,000,000 times.  This gives the first "random" number.
17 Hashed 999,999 times gives the second number, etc. ie:
18
19     R(0) = seed
20     R(N+1) = SHA256(R(N))
21
22 This way the remote node needs only to remember the last R(N) it was
23 given, and it can calculate any R for N+1 or above.
24
25 However, this means we need to generate 1 million hashes up front, and
26 then do almost as many hashes to derive the next number.  That's slow.
27
28 A Tree Solution
29 ---------------
30
31 A better solution is to use a binary tree, with the seed at the root.
32 The left child is the same as the parent, the right child is the
33 SHA256() of the parent with one bit flipped (corresponding to the
34 height).
35
36 This gives a tree like so:
37
38                       seed
39                     /      \
40                   /          \
41                 /              \
42               /                  \
43             seed                   SHA256(seed^1)
44            /    \                  /             \
45        seed    SHA256(seed^2)  SHA256(seed^1)  SHA256(SHA256(seed^1)^2)
46 Index:  0         1                2                  3
47
48 Clearly, giving R(2) allows you to derive R(3), giving R(1) allows you
49 to derive nothing new (you still have to remember R(2)), and giving
50 R(0) allows you to derive everything.
51
52 In pseudocode, this looks like the following for a 64 bit tree:
53
54 generate_from_seed(index):
55     value = seed
56     for bit in 0 to 63:
57         if bit set in index:
58             flip(bit) in value
59             value = SHA256(value)
60     return value
61
62
63 The Receiver's Tree
64 -------------------
65
66 To derive the value for a index N, you need to have the root of a tree
67 which contains it.  That is the same as needing an index I which is N
68 rounded down in binary: eg. if N is 0b001100001, you need 0b001100000,
69 0b001000000 or 0b000000000.
70
71 Pseudocode:
72
73 # Can we derive the value for to_index from from_index?
74 can_derive(from_index, to_index):
75     # to_index must be a subtree under from_index; this is the same as
76     # saying that to_index must be the same as from_index up to the
77     # trailing zeros in from_index.
78     for bit in count_trailing_zeroes(from_index)..63:
79         if bit set in from_index != bit set in to_index:
80             return false
81     return true
82
83 # Derive a value from a lesser index: generalization of generate_from_seed()
84 derive(from_index, to_index, from_value):
85     assert(can_derive(from_index, to_index))
86     value = from_value
87     for bit in 0..63:
88         if bit set in to_index and not bit set in from_index:
89             flip bit in value
90             value = SHA256(value)
91     return value
92
93 If you are receiving values (in reverse order), you need to remember
94 up to 64 of them to derive all previous values.  The simplest method
95 is to keep an array, indexed by the number of trailing zeroes in the
96 received index:
97
98 # Receive a new value (assumes we receive them in order)
99 receive_value(index, value):
100     pos = count_trailing_zeroes(index)
101     # We should be able to generate every lesser value, otherwise invalid
102     for i in 0..pos-1:
103        if derive(index, value, known[i].index) != known[i].value:
104             return false
105     known[pos].index = index
106     known[pos].value = value
107     return true
108
109 To derive a previous value, find an element in that array from which
110 you can derive the value you want, eg:
111
112 # Find an old value
113 regenerate_value(index):
114     for i in known:
115         if can_derive(i.index, index):
116             return derive(i.index, i.value, index)
117     fail
118
119 You can see the implementation for more optimized variants of the
120 above code.
121
122 Rusty Russell <rusty@rustcorp.com.au>